Voltammetric behaviour and trace determination of copper at a mercury-free screen-printed carbon electrode

Honeychurch, K. C., Hawkins, D. M., Hart, J. P. and Cowell, D. C. (2002) Voltammetric behaviour and trace determination of copper at a mercury-free screen-printed carbon electrode. Talanta, 57 (3). pp. 565-574. ISSN 0039-9140

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Publisher's URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0039-9140(02)00060-7

Abstract

Screen-printed carbon electrodes (SPCEs), without chemical modification, have been investigated as disposable sensors for the measurement of trace levels of Cu2+. Cyclic voltammetry was employed to elucidate the electrochemical behaviour of Cu2+ at these electrodes in a variety of supporting electrolytes. For all of the electrolytes studied the anodic peaks, obtained on the reverse scans, showed that the Cu2+ had been deposited as a thin layer on the surface of the SPCE. The anodic peak of greatest magnitude was obtained in 0.1 M malonic acid. The possibility of determining Cu2+ at trace levels using this medium was examined by differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry (DPASV). The effect of Bi3+, Cd2+, Fe3+, Hg-2(2+), Pb2+, Sb3+ and Zn2+ on the Cu stripping peak was examined was found to significantly effect the response gained. The sensors and under the conditions employed, only Hg-2(2+) were evaluated by carrying out Cu2+ determinations on spiked and unspiked serum and water samples. The mean recovery was found in all cases to be > 90% and the performance characteristics indicated the method holds promise for trace Cu2+ levels by employment of Hg-free SPCEs using DPASV

Item Type:Article
Uncontrolled Keywords:screen-printed carbon electrodes, copper, differential pulse stripping voltammetry, mercury-free
Faculty/Department:Faculty of Health and Applied Sciences > Department of Biological, Biomedical and Analytical Sciences
ID Code:10789
Deposited By: Dr K. Honeychurch
Deposited On:06 Aug 2010 13:38
Last Modified:02 Apr 2014 16:19

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