Regulation of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) splicing from pro-angiogenic to anti-angiogenic isoforms: A novel therapeutic strategy for angiogenesis

Nowak, D. G., Amin, E. M., Rennel, E. S., Hoareau-Aveilla, C., Gammons, M., Damodoran, G., Hagiwara, M., Harper, S. J., Woolard, J., Ladomery, M. and Bates, D. O. (2010) Regulation of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) splicing from pro-angiogenic to anti-angiogenic isoforms: A novel therapeutic strategy for angiogenesis. Journal of Biological Chemistry, 285 (8). pp. 5532-5540. ISSN 0021-9258

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Publisher's URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M109.074930

Abstract

Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is produced either as a pro-angiogenic or anti-angiogenic protein depending upon splice site choice in the terminal, eighth exon. Proximal splice site selection (PSS) in exon 8 generates pro-angiogenic isoforms such as VEGF165, and distal splice site selection (DSS) results in anti-angiogenic isoforms such as VEGF165b. Cellular decisions on splice site selection depend upon the activity of RNA-binding splice factors, such as ASF/SF2, which have previously been shown to regulate VEGF splice site choice. To determine the mechanism by which the pro-angiogenic splice site choice is mediated, we investigated the effect of inhibition of ASF/SF2 phosphorylation by SR protein kinases (SRPK1/2) on splice site choice in epithelial cells and in in vivo angiogenesis models. Epithelial cells treated with insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) increased PSS and produced more VEGF165 and less VEGF165b. This down-regulation of DSS and increased PSS was blocked by protein kinase C inhibition and SRPK1/2 inhibition. IGF-1 treatment resulted in nuclear localization of ASF/SF2, which was blocked by SPRK1/2 inhibition. Pull-down assay and RNA immunoprecipitation using VEGF mRNA sequences identified an 11-nucleotide sequence required for ASF/SF2 binding. Injection of an SRPK1/2 inhibitor reduced angiogenesis in a mouse model of retinal neovascularization, suggesting that regulation of alternative splicing could be a potential therapeutic strategy in angiogenic pathologies.

Item Type:Article
Faculty/Department:Faculty of Health and Applied Sciences > Department of Biological, Biomedical and Analytical Sciences
ID Code:10887
Deposited By: A. Lawson
Deposited On:10 Aug 2010 13:15
Last Modified:12 Aug 2013 08:02

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