Why Neo flies, and why he shouldn’t: the critique of cyberpunk in Gwyneth Jones’s Escape Plans and M. John Harrison’s Signs of Life

Bould, M. (2010) Why Neo flies, and why he shouldn’t: the critique of cyberpunk in Gwyneth Jones’s Escape Plans and M. John Harrison’s Signs of Life. In: Murphy, G. and Vint, S., eds. (2010) Beyond Cyberpunk: New Critical Perspectives. Routledge, pp. 116-134. ISBN 9780415876872

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Abstract

This essay argues that the fantasies of disembodied flight evident in sf since the genre's inception become an explicit, and largely uncritical, metaphor for supposedly 'friction-free' capital-in-circulation in cyberpunk fiction of the 1980s and 1990s. Jones's Escape Plans and Harrison's Signs of Life offer critical visions of this ubiquitous metaphor.

Item Type:Book Section
Uncontrolled Keywords:cyberpunk, capitalism, globalisation, Marxism, science fiction
Faculty/Department:Faculty of Arts, Creative Industries and Education > Department of Arts and Cultural Industries
ID Code:12128
Deposited By: Dr M. Bould
Deposited On:22 Dec 2010 10:02
Last Modified:12 Aug 2013 08:03

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