The politics of humanitarian intervention: A critical analogy of the British response to end the slave trade and the civil war in Sierra Leone.

Shaw, I. S. (2010) The politics of humanitarian intervention: A critical analogy of the British response to end the slave trade and the civil war in Sierra Leone. Journal of Global Ethics, 6 (3). pp. 273-285. ISSN 1744-9626 (Print) 1744-9634 (Online)

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Publisher's URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17449626.2010.524799

Abstract

A leading scholar of humanitarian intervention, Chris Brown (2002) refers to British internal politics to satisfy the influential church and other nonconformist libertarian community leaders, and above all ‘undermining Britain’s competitors, such as Spain and Portugal, who were still reliant on slave labour to power their economies, as the principal motivation for calls to end the slave trade than any genuine humanitarian concerns of racial equality or global justice. Drawing on an empirical exploration, this article seeks to draw a parallel between this politics of humanitarian intervention which characterised the abolition movement, albeit rarely recognised in the academic literature, and the British intervention to end the almost 11 year civil war in Sierra Leone. The article will conclude with a discussion on the implications of this politics of humanitarian intervention in the reconstruction of post conflict Sierra Leone.

Item Type:Article
Uncontrolled Keywords:humanitarian intervention, slave trade, civil war, Sierra Leone
Faculty/Department:Faculty of Arts, Creative Industries and Education > Department of Arts and Cultural Industries
ID Code:13183
Deposited By: U. Mulligan
Deposited On:11 Nov 2010 12:18
Last Modified:12 Aug 2013 08:04

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