Do employability skills really matter in the graduate labour market? The case of business and management graduates

Wilton, N. (2011) Do employability skills really matter in the graduate labour market? The case of business and management graduates. Work, Employment and Society, 25 (1). pp. 85-100. ISSN 0950-0170

[img] PDF - Published Version
Restricted to Registered users only

428kB
[img] Microsoft Word - Accepted Version
147kB
[img]
Preview
PDF - Accepted Version
183kB

Publisher's URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0950017010389244

Abstract

Two dominant rationales are offered by UK policymakers for the continued expansion of higher education: to service the high-skill labour requirements of a knowledge economy, and to increase educational and employment opportunities for under-represented groups. The discourse of employability connects these two rationales in a simplistic manner. Individual employability is described as both the means by which to obtain and maintain high-quality employment and to eradicate the social reproduction of inequality. However, evidence drawn from a survey of graduate careers suggests that for a cohort of recent business and management graduates, the relationship between employability and employment is far from straightforward.The data suggest that traditional labour market disadvantage still appears to be an impediment to achievement, regardless of the extent to which graduates develop employability skills during their undergraduate studies.

Item Type:Article
Uncontrolled Keywords:diversity, employability, graduates, higher education, labour market, skills
Faculty/Department:Faculty of Business and Law > Department of Business Management
ID Code:14492
Deposited By: Dr N. Wilton
Deposited On:13 May 2011 11:36
Last Modified:27 Jun 2014 11:34

Request a change to this item

Total Document Downloads in Past 12 Months

Document Downloads

Total Document Downloads

More statistics for this item...
Copyright 2013 © UWE better together