‘Happy Being Me’ in the UK: A controlled evaluation of a school-based body image intervention with pre-adolescent children

Bird, E., Halliwell, E. and Diedrichs, P. C. (2012) ‘Happy Being Me’ in the UK: A controlled evaluation of a school-based body image intervention with pre-adolescent children. In: South West Public Health Scientific Conference, Weston-super-Mare, UK, 1st February, 2012.

[img] Microsoft PowerPoint - Published Version
463kB
[img]
Preview
PDF - Published Version
307kB

Abstract

Background Body image concerns among children are commonly associated with the onset of severe health-related implications including reduced physical activity, unhealthy eating behaviours, and low self-esteem, among others. Historically, attempts to address these issues have been developed for, and conducted with, adolescent girls alone. However given the increase in evidence for the onset of negative body image in pre-adolescent boys as well as girls, and if these damaging and costly health problems are to be addressed; early intervention that aims to prevent the onset of negative body image in children, is an important public health priority. Aims In response to the dearth of research investigating the efficacy of body image interventions with a mixed, pre-adolescent cohort; this novel study aimed to evaluate an adapted version of ‘Happy Being Me’, a school-based body image intervention for pre-adolescent girls and boys. Methods Forty-three 10-11 year olds participated in a three-week, school-based intervention programme (45 in control group), completing measures on risk factors for negative body image, eating behaviours and self-esteem at baseline, post-intervention and three month follow-up. The intervention focused on educating children about the negative consequences associated with internalisation of the thin-ideal, appearance-related teasing, appearance-related conversations and body comparison. The programme also targeted self-esteem and unhealthy eating behaviours. Results For girls, participants in the intervention condition reported significant improvements in risk factors for negative body image, eating behaviours and intervention topic knowledge at post-intervention, although changes were not all sustained at three month follow-up. For boys, participants in the intervention condition reported significant improvements in risk factors for negative body image at post-intervention, but were not maintained. Conclusions The findings indicate that this adapted school-based intervention, facilitated with a mixed sex, pre-adolescent cohort may have the potential to address the ever-increasing body image concerns observed among young people across the UK.

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Uncontrolled Keywords:body image, intervention, pre-adolescents, body satisfaction
Faculty/Department:Faculty of Health and Applied Sciences > Department of Health and Social Sciences
ID Code:16499
Deposited By: E. Bird
Deposited On:08 Feb 2012 10:04
Last Modified:31 May 2014 05:39

Request a change to this item

Total Document Downloads in Past 12 Months

Document Downloads

Total Document Downloads

More statistics for this item...
Copyright 2013 © UWE better together