Attachment and coping of dementia care staff: The role of staff attachment style, geriatric nursing self-efficacy, and approaches to dementia in burnout

Kokkonen, T.-M., Cheston, R., Dallos, R. and Smart, C. and Plymouth Doctorate in Clinical Psychology, Avon and Wiltshire Mental health Partnership trust (2014) Attachment and coping of dementia care staff: The role of staff attachment style, geriatric nursing self-efficacy, and approaches to dementia in burnout. Dementia, 13 (4). pp. 544-568. ISSN 1471-3012 Available from: http://eprints.uwe.ac.uk/18025

[img] Microsoft Word 2007 - Accepted Version
94kB
[img]
Preview
PDF - Accepted Version
Available under License All Rights Reserved.

527kB

Publisher's URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1471301213479469

Abstract/Description

Past research suggests that dementia care staff are vulnerable to the development of burnout, which has implications for staff well-being and hence the quality of care for people with dementia. Studying personal vulnerability factors in burnout is important as it can guide staff training and support. Attachment theory suggests that adult attachment styles affect caregiving relationships and individuals’ responses to stress, providing a framework for understanding caregivers’ styles of coping. This cross-sectional survey study examined relationships between staff attachment styles, geriatric nursing self-efficacy, and approaches to dementia in burnout. Seventy-seven members of dementia care staff working on inpatient wards for older people completed self-report questionnaires. Insecure attachment, lower levels of self-efficacy, and more optimistic attitudes in staff were related to higher levels of burnout. Staff training on the role of attachment in dementia care is recommended. Further research is required to explore mediating factors between adult attachment styles and burnout.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:First published online 14 March 2013
Uncontrolled Keywords:attachment, burnout, caregiving, dementia, staff
Faculty/Department:Faculty of Health and Applied Sciences > Department of Nursing and Midwifery
ID Code:18025
Deposited By: Professor R. Cheston
Deposited On:02 Jan 2013 15:44
Last Modified:11 Nov 2017 07:19

Request a change to this item

Total Document Downloads in Past 12 Months

Document Downloads

Total Document Downloads

More statistics for this item...