Where to park? A behavioural comparison of bus-based park and ride and city centre car park usage in Bath, UK

Clayton, W., Ben-Elia, E., Parkhurst, G. and Ricci, M. (2014) Where to park? A behavioural comparison of bus-based park and ride and city centre car park usage in Bath, UK. Journal of Transport Geography, 36. pp. 124-133. ISSN 0966-6923 Available from: http://eprints.uwe.ac.uk/22083

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Publisher's URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jtrangeo.2014.03.011

Abstract/Description

Integrating car parking facilities with public transport in Park and Ride (P&R) facilities has the potential to shorten car trips, contributing to more sustainable mobility. There is an on-going debate about the actual effects of P&R on the transport system at the subregional level. A key issue in these systemic effects, is the relative attractiveness of city centre car parks (CCCP), P&R and public transport. The paper presents the findings of a comparative empirical case-study based on a field survey of CCCP and P&R users conducted in the city of Bath, UK. Spatial and statistical analyses are applied. Radial distance to parking, availability of P&R sites in the direction of travel, gender, age, income and party-size are found to be important factors in a binary logistic regression model, explaining the revealed-preference of parking type. Stated analysis of foregone parking alternatives suggests more use of public transport and walking/cycling would likely occur without first-best parking alternatives. The policy implications and possible planning alternatives to P&R at the urban fringes for achieving greater sustainability goals are also discussed.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Transport Geography. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version will be published in Journal of Transport Geography.
Uncontrolled Keywords:transport policy, park and ride, parking, sustainable mobility, travel behaviour, public transport
Faculty/Department:Faculty of Environment and Technology > Department of Geography and Environmental Management
ID Code:22083
Deposited By: Dr W. Clayton
Deposited On:25 Nov 2013 10:42
Last Modified:20 Sep 2017 18:00

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