Dementia as an existential threat: The importance of self-esteem, social connectedness and meaning in life

Cheston, R., Christopher, G. and Ismail, S. (2015) Dementia as an existential threat: The importance of self-esteem, social connectedness and meaning in life. Science Progress, 98 (4). pp. 416-419. ISSN 0036-8504 Available from: http://eprints.uwe.ac.uk/27451

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Publisher's URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.3184/003685015X14467423210693

Abstract/Description

Dementia is one of the most feared of all illnesses. If we are to understand the psychological impact of dementia, then it is important that we place this within the context of how humans respond to existential threats. Research over the last 20 years has consistently indicated that higher levels of self-esteem and social connectedness and a greater sense of meaning in life all buffer people against threat. Applying this framework to dementia care may enables us to understand more about the psychological functions of forgetting, as well as reframing the use of the past by some people affected by dementia as an attempt to generate a life of meaning and connectedness. Finally, it may help to generate new methods of intervening such as the therapeutic use of nostalgia.

Item Type:Article
Uncontrolled Keywords:dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, mnemic neglect, nostalgia, self-esteem, social connectedness, meaning in life, existential threat
Faculty/Department:Faculty of Health and Applied Sciences > Department of Health and Social Sciences
ID Code:27451
Deposited By: Professor R. Cheston
Deposited On:06 Nov 2015 12:02
Last Modified:02 Feb 2016 19:43

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