The deprivation indices: Taking stock of the FTSE

Miles, R. (2016) The deprivation indices: Taking stock of the FTSE. In: The Interdisciplinary Social Sciences Knowledge Community, Imperial College London, London, UK, 2-4 August 2016. [In Press] Available from: http://eprints.uwe.ac.uk/28449

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Publisher's URL: http://i16.cgpublisher.com/proposals/312

Abstract/Description

In The deprivation indices: Taking stock of the FTSE, the 100 logos and brand identities of the UK’s top 100 FTSE index companies are presented through a rapid fire game of word association from which a narrative (of sorts) emerges. What is revealed is the story of how these companies (Vodafone, United Utilities, Dorothy Perkins, Shell etc.) have become entwined within the fabric of everyday life, and what is offered is an interpretation of their impacts on a community. But this isn’t just a story. The Deprivation Indices raises questions about class and identity in a neoliberal political landscape and asks if it is possible for a disenfranchised, underpaid and overworked population to build creative relationships with images outside of the dominant discourse of late capitalism. This is a deliberately provocative, radical writing and performance inspired by artists like Penny Arcade - Bitch! Dyke! Faghag! Whore! And exhibitions like Branded and on Display. This performance relies upon ‘reclamation’ and ‘reverse discourse’ (Foucault, History of Sexuality: Vol 1) as a move towards personal and socio-political empowerment. In re-appropriating the logos, and brand identities that the FTSE Top 100 companies use to promote their practices, I develop a user’s guide to, and satirically critique, the most powerful companies in the UK.

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Other)
Uncontrolled Keywords:FTSE, Foucault, capitalism
Faculty/Department:Faculty of Arts, Creative Industries and Education > School of Art and Design
ID Code:28449
Deposited By: R. Miles
Deposited On:16 Mar 2016 09:18
Last Modified:16 Mar 2016 09:18

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