Multi-stakeholder collaboration in urban freight consolidation schemes: Drivers and barriers to implementation

Paddeu, D., Parkhurst, G., Fadda, P., Fancello, G. and Ricci, M. (2016) Multi-stakeholder collaboration in urban freight consolidation schemes: Drivers and barriers to implementation. Transport. ISSN 1648-4142 [In Press] Available from: http://eprints.uwe.ac.uk/30461

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Publisher's URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/tran20/current

Abstract/Description

In recent years, there has been enthusiasm amongst commentators that shared-resource economic models can both create new commercial opportunities and address policy problems, including in the transport sector. Within the city logistics subsector, this new model is exemplified by the emergence of Urban Freight Consolidation Centres (UCCs). UCCs replace multiple ‘last-mile’ delivery movements, many of which involving small consignments, by a common receiving point (the consolidation centre), normally on the periphery of a city, with the final part of the delivery being shared by the consignments in a small freight vehicle. Such arrangements can represent a good compromise between the needs of city centre businesses and their customers on the one hand (i.e. high availability of a range of goods) and local and global sustainability objectives on the other. At the same time, by sharing logistics facilities and delivery vehicles, UCCs offer added-value services to both urban economic actors, such as retailers, and network logistics providers. However, UCCs add to the complexity of logistics chains, requiring additional contracts, communications and movement stages. These arrangements also introduce additional actors within the supply of delivery services, notably local authorities present as promoters and funders, rather than simply as regulators, companies specialised in the UFCC operation, and companies which provide specialist technologies, such as electric delivery vehicles. UCCs therefore also represent an example of multi-stakeholder collaboration. Drawing on the results of a 2013 survey in Bristol (UK) and a further survey carried out in 2015 in Cagliari (IT), the present paper provides an in-depth comparison of the differences in the perceptions of urban freight users and stakeholders towards UCCs.

Item Type:Article
Uncontrolled Keywords:sharing resources, sustainable urban freight transport, Urban Freight Consolidation Centre (UCC), city logistics, case study
Faculty/Department:Faculty of Environment and Technology > Department of Geography and Environmental Management
ID Code:30461
Deposited By: Professor G. Parkhurst
Deposited On:28 Nov 2016 14:39
Last Modified:23 Oct 2017 06:32

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