Lifelong learning and the knowledge economy: Those that know and those that do not - the discourse of the European Union

Brine, J. (2006) Lifelong learning and the knowledge economy: Those that know and those that do not - the discourse of the European Union. British Educational Research Journal, 32 (5). pp. 649-665. ISSN 1469-3518

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Publisher's URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01411920600895676

Abstract

The fifty-year retrospective has led to recent media interest in the comprehensive school. Bristol, located in the south-west of England, is frequently portrayed as an early provider. This article draws on documentary evidence and life-history interviews with ex-pupils to explore this claim. It finds that they were not comprehensive schools, but selective bilaterals that, despite including grammar and secondary modern streams within the same physical site, constructed, through their curricular and non-curricular practices, a rigid divide between the two. The selective schooling of the bilateral consolidated the classificatory practices that began in primary school. Framed by Bourdieu's concepts of habitus, disposition and classificatory practices, it is a study of explict selective schooling that was reliant not only on key moments of selection, and differentiated curricula, but on everyday practices and signifiers of difference.

Item Type:Article
Uncontrolled Keywords:lifelong learning, knowledge economy, European Union
Faculty/Department:Faculty of Arts, Creative Industries and Education > Department of Education
ID Code:5990
Deposited By: R. Upload account
Deposited On:22 Jan 2010 15:11
Last Modified:10 Jan 2014 14:11

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