Menu
Login to UWE

The differentiation of biodegradable and non-biodegradable dissolved organic matter in wastewaters using fluorescence spectroscopy

Reynolds, D. M. (2002) The differentiation of biodegradable and non-biodegradable dissolved organic matter in wastewaters using fluorescence spectroscopy. Journal of Chemical Technology & Biotechnology, 77 (8). pp. 965-972. ISSN 1097-4660

Full text not available from this repository

Publisher's URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jctb.664

Abstract

The chemical and biochemical oxygen demand values of a number of synthetic and wastewater samples were determined using fluorescence spectroscopy. Treated and untreated sewage samples were obtained from a local sewage treatment works while synthetic samples were analysed before, during, and after treatment via a rotating biodisc contactor. Fluorescence intensities were normalised using the water Raman signal as an internal standard and corrections applied to take into account the attenuation effects caused by the sample matrix. The fluorescence emission spectra (λexc = 280 nm) of synthetic and sewage samples were very similar in that two main fluorescence bands centred around 350 nm and 440 nm were observed in all samples. Normalised fluorescence data, centred at 350 nm, correlate well with corresponding BOD, COD and TOC values (R2 values ranging between 0.93 and 0.98). Using BOD, COD and TOC data the fluorescence at 350 nm and 440 nm can be apportioned to biodegradable and non-biodegradable dissolved organic matter respectively. The findings of this research show that fluorescence data can be used to quantify oxygen demand values (chemical and biochemical) and total organic carbon values. Furthermore, the fluorescence spectral response can be apportioned to biodegradable (BOD) and non-biodegradable (COD − BOD) dissolved organic matter. The potential of using fluorescence spectroscopy as a possible tool for real-time monitoring of sewage wastes is discussed.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:This paper forms part of body of work spanning over 10 years. This work has pioneered (nationally and internationally) the use of fluorescence spectroscopy as a tool for the characterization of sewage wastes.
Uncontrolled Keywords:fluorescence spectroscopy, biodegradable, non-biodegradable, sewage, dissolved organic matter (DOM), monitoring
Faculty/Department:Faculty of Environment and Technology
Faculty of Health and Applied Sciences > Department of Biological, Biomedical and Analytical Sciences
ID Code:6203
Deposited By: R. Upload account
Deposited On:22 Jan 2010 15:11
Last Modified:24 Mar 2015 12:14

Request a change to this item

 

Copyright 2015 © UWE better together