Evaluation of the current knowledge limitations in breast cancer research: a gap analysis

Thompson, A., Brennan, K., Cox, A., Gee, J., Harcourt, D., Harris, A., Harvie, M., Holen, I., Howell, A., Nicholson, R., Steel, M. and Streuli, C. (2008) Evaluation of the current knowledge limitations in breast cancer research: a gap analysis. Breast Cancer Research, 10 (2). R26. ISSN 1465-5411

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Publisher's URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/bcr1983

Abstract

Background: A gap analysis was conducted to determine which areas of breast cancer research, if targeted by researchers and funding bodies, could produce the greatest impact on patients. Methods: Fifty-six Breast Cancer Campaign grant holders and prominent UK breast cancer researchers participated in a gap analysis of current breast cancer research. Before, during and following the meeting, groups in seven key research areas participated in cycles of presentation, literature review and discussion. Summary papers were prepared by each group and collated into this position paper highlighting the research gaps, with recommendations for action. Results: Gaps were identified in all seven themes. General barriers to progress were lack of financial and practical resources, and poor collaboration between disciplines. Critical gaps in each theme included: (1) genetics (knowledge of genetic changes, their effects and interactions); (2) initiation of breast cancer (how developmental signalling pathways cause ductal elongation and branching at the cellular level and influence stem cell dynamics, and how their disruption initiates tumour formation); (3) progression of breast cancer (deciphering the intracellular and extracellular regulators of early progression, tumour growth, angiogenesis and metastasis); (4) therapies and targets (understanding who develops advanced disease); (5) disease markers (incorporating intelligent trial design into all studies to ensure new treatments are tested in patient groups stratified using biomarkers); (6) prevention (strategies to prevent oestrogen-receptor negative tumours and the long-term effects of chemoprevention for oestrogenreceptor positive tumours); (7) psychosocial aspects of cancer (the use of appropriate psychosocial interventions, and the personal impact of all stages of the disease among patients from a range of ethnic and demographic backgrounds). Conclusion Through recommendations to address these gaps with future research, the long-term benefits to patients will include: better estimation of risk in families with breast cancer and strategies to reduce risk; better prediction of drug response and patient prognosis; improved tailoring of treatments to patient subgroups and development of new therapeutic approaches; earlier initiation of treatment; more effective use of resources for screening populations; and an enhanced experience for people with or at risk of breast cancer and their families. The challenge to funding bodies and researchers in all disciplines is to focus on these gaps and to drive advances in knowledge into improvements in patient care.

Item Type:Article
Uncontrolled Keywords:breast cancer, oncology
Faculty/Department:Faculty of Health and Applied Sciences > Department of Health and Social Sciences
ID Code:7318
Deposited By: C. Foyle
Deposited On:01 Nov 2010 09:24
Last Modified:22 Oct 2014 18:08

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